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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but to me, you takes the low hacking fruit first. it's the pentagon. and, you know, there was a time when i was a conservative, and i thought if you want to cut the pentagon budget, you must be some kind of come -- comey that hates america. the pentagon in the department of defense and the only department not subject to audit, that doesn't mean they fail the awe cut or look at all the things they found. they're not subject to audit. what we've been finding figuring out is piece by piece is that for example, since 9/11 in the nine years after 9/11, the pentagon budget went up. the increase in the pentagon budget was $2 trillion. $1 trillion went to the war, the other trillion nobody knows where it went to because the air force has been scaled back, the navy has been scaled back, the army increased margely, but it it's budget was vastly increased. where did the money go? and i think this is a crisis that we're enduring that is going have to require both liberals and conservative to rethink re-examine some of the sacred cows and say we can't afford to say this is off the table for cuts. that's
of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant part of money. part of money. >>
through and find areas where we could transfer responsibility out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act, and the future of the republican party on book tv. the senator has written several reports, including his latest, the debt bomb. that is live sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span-2. >> now we talk to a capitol hill reporter about the senate's work on the defense authorization bill. >> the senate has been in a holding pattern on the defense authorization bill, but finally found a way to start consideration of amendments. what broke the logjam? >> rand paul had a desire to bring an amendment that would have applied sixth amendment rights to citizens who had been taken in the war on terror on u.s. homeland. he was concerned he would not get the time. senator mccain is the ranking member of the armed services committee. he assured him he would not try to block the amendment. alternately, senator dianne feinstein agreed to what senator p
of the conditions and that he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. the pentagon says manning was held in accordance with the rules but if convicted, he could face life in prison. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence covering this at the pentagon. he said he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. they tried to poke some holes in that today. did they succeed? >> in some ways, erin, very much so. they got manning to admit the guards never actually ordered him to drop the blanket that was covering his body. let's back up. manning had made a crack because they had placed so many restrictions on him in confinement that if he really wanted to kill himself he could hang himself by his underwear. the guards took that seriously and that night he was stripped naked, except for a blanket. when he got up the next morning, he had to stand at parade rest. now manning had to admit today that he inferred from what the guard said that he had to drop that blanket to stand at parade rest and he admitted today they never actually said that. and, in fact, manning said that in later days, and in subseq
the pentagon's ban on women serving in most combat units. they have been in combat already, especially in afghanistan, not just because of what the marines did in april or what the pentagon did in february when it opened 1400 combat related positions unavailable to female troops. that easing and bending sounds like progress. glass ceilings only ease and bend so far. more than 238,000 other military positions, mostly in the army and marine corps remain off limits to women. this week, new action was taken to change that. with the help of the aclu and the service women's action network, four service women, one of whom is my guest, filed a federal lawsuit against defense secretary, leon panetta, arguing that any pentagon ban against women in combat roles is unconstitutional. statistics say more than 1,000 women have been killed in the line of duty in iraq and afghanistan. many lacked combat training, having to learn on the fly. which leaves us with the question. why can't we have a few good women too at the taubl are two people that are asking the very question. one of them is one of the p
, if the pentagon things they want men in combat and not women in combat to win wars, the court is very hesitant to tell the generals how to run the battle field and what you found is the distinction between combat and non-combat is blurred, and you send a woman over there in a non-combat role and you know what? she's in combat all of a sudden when there are attacks because there's no front line. she, however, is not getting paid the same amount of money and not getting the same ability to get promotions as the men, so this lawsuit is saying something different than prior lawsuits which is basically the roles have been blurred, and these women are really in combat and they are not being paid for it. there are interesting arguments here, randi. >> this certainly is not the first time, no women in combat policy has been challenged and come into play. this is very different, you say, but how have the challenges fared in the past? >> they haven't fared very well in the past, and i think number one the reason originally was, you know, women were considered to be too delicate and tender and feminine t
. the fiscal cliff now 31 days away, still no mention of sequestration cuts. cuts in the pentagon budget with deadly consequences? can this congress and this president figure out how to do the right thing? admiral james lyons joins us next. look, if youave co like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and howhat feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps contl my copd mptotoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva ishe only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalationowder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. scuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek imdiate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain or problems passing urine. other side effects include drmouth and constipation. nothing can re
tridivision headquarters right back to the pentagon. we said that should never happen again. so we looked at command of control relationships in this exercise. so we're going to bring up the next panel and this exercise was conducted in august and we're going to take a few minutes to get the panel up here and we'll have the panel moderator introduce us, john vaughan from harris, but if any of you need to make a head call, behind these screens we have men and women's heads, restrooms for those of you who don't know the term. behind those screens. rich is telling me i'm going back wrong end of the ship, back that way behind the screens, so feel free to go back there. so let's take a few minutes now and bring the panel up and the panel moderator, john vaughan thank my name is john vaughan, i'm from harris corporation. we're delighted a sponsor again this year of san francisco fleet week. our focus, if you had an opportunity to see on the way in the demonstration, is on interoperatability. this has been a challenge as lts general just mentioned. in the past we have been blocked in int
of sequestration cuts. cuts in the pentagon budget with deadly consequences? can this congress and this president figure out how to the right thing? admiral james lyons joins us next. ♪ lou: 31 days until the fiscal clef, the threat of sequestration largely being ignored. automatic spending cuts tohe tune of 1 trillion over ten years, hal coming from our defense budget. joining me now to discuss the impact on our military, nestle security, we are joined by hammer and -- admiral james lyons. they to have you back with us. your thoughts on the impact of sequestration is, indeed, it goes into affect year. >> in the words of the secretary of defense, leon panetta, this will be a disaster. what the obama administration is doing is unilaterally reducing the military capability of our forces. this is at a time when we have china with its massive force expansion, building a world capable force projection capability. we have the russians modernizing the russian forces. we still have the iranian problem totally unresolved, north korea always a flashpoint. look at the middle east. anything far from being
at the pentagon. the general counsel of the defense department, jay johnson, speaking today at oxford university in britain broaching a subject that nobody at a high level of government has been willing to officially broach since 9/11. >> how will this conflict end? it is an unconventional conflict against an unconventional enemy and will not end in conventional terms. we cannot, and should not, expect al qaeda and. its associated forces to all surrender, all lay down their weapons in an old field or to sign a peace treaty with us. they are terrorist organizations. nor can we capture or kill every last terrorist who claims an affiliation with al qaeda. i can offer no prediction about when this conflict will end. or whether we are as winston churchill once described it near the "beginning of the end." on the present course, i do believe, there will be a tipping point. a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured and the group is no longer able to attempt or launch a strategic attack against the united states. such that
transfer responsibilities that are not truly the defense of the country out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >>> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet at book tv >>> about a month left in 2012 many publications are putting out their year-end list of notable books. book tv will feature several of these lists focusing on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in the "washington post" best books of 2012. ..
expert used to work at the pentagon. now work at the american enterprise institute. thanks for coming on the show. >> thanks for having me. melissa: do you think they will be successl in this? do you think sancons aimed at ending flow of gold into iran will really work first of all? >> sanctions itself isn't going to reverse the determination of iran to, get a nuclear weapons capability. but what we're doing is applying increasingly amounts of pressure on iran and about a year ago t senate voted 100-0 to impose banking sanctions on iran and there is very little from which we can get such bipartisan unty. what happens is iran started sending oil, sending gas to turkey in exchange for gold and so what the cop guess is doing now, again with the unanimous vote, the senate, that is, is to try to plug this last hole. if precedent is to be believed it will increase pressure a huge amount. melissa: but you know turkey wants that natural gas. that is why they're paying in gold. so i mean how realistic is it that we can actually stop them from doing this, from buying it and giving them gold? >>
. out front tonight, barbara starr, pentagon correspondent. this is a new front. drones themselves have changed the entire way this country will fight war forevermore but let's start with the bioswimmer. what can it do? >> reporter: well, this is a very interesting project that was actually funded by the department of homeland security to basically -- it takes the shape of a tuna because tuna can maneuver in the water, they can get into small places, and the idea is if you could put sensors on this, cameras, acoustics, radar, whatever, you could put this kind of device into u.s. bombers, maybe to go through shipwrecks, maybe to go through underground debris, maybe just to keep watch for potential terrorist attacks on u.s. ports. the whole idea with all of these programs is that nature really is, you know, the best way. there's a good lesson to be learned here. these are devices that can move as they do in nature like a tuna. tuna is pretty good at getting through the tight spots under water. >> when you think about just under water, simple things, 90% of the world's goods go by ship. yo
. split between defense and domestic programs. a pentagon official says is he cautiously optimistic that the congress and the white house will come up with a deal to avoid the cliffs. one republic senator says he is more worried than ever. it's the top story at the bottom of the hour. mike emanuel is on it this evening. the idea was that these cuts would be so painful that this thing would be so horrible. that this would throw us into such a mess that there is no way these loons on capitol hill would let this happen. but lo and behold. >> exactly, shep. certainly 2012 campaign politics did not help congress and the white house find alternatives to these cuts. today a top republic senator told me time is running out. >> i'm more worried about the sequester now than ever because it seems to be overshadowed by discussions over going off the fiscal cliff which is a separate but related matter. a combination of those two things both huge tax increase and a $1.2 trillion in cuts will put us in a recession. defense and domestic cuts could be avoided if a grand bargain is struck to avoid th
to run the pentagon, that makes for a very interesting senate race in the state of massachusetts, once again. >> maybe, maybe not. what people keep forgetting in all of this is that the massachusetts legislature is run by democrats who could always just change the law back so that there's not a special election and it becomes an appointment, again. yes, some dominos falling in massachusetts if senator kerry gets that post, particularly if there is an election, which is the state of the law right now. scott brown expected to run for it and about as strong a republican as you can get in the state of massachusetts. >> molly ball, thank you so much. lynn sweet, one of my favorite ladies. lynn, i did not get to ask you about your jesse jackson, but i would encourage folks to read on what you wrote over gesjesse jackson jr. over the past week or so. some very insightful reporting. >>> 31 days out to the fiscal cliff. we will go live to see what the president is saying to house leaders and whether that will keep us any further away from the edge. >>> also, how did the president capture the la
that are not truly in defense of the country out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's index. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt bomb. join our freedom our conversation with calls, e-mails and tweets comical doctor and author and senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span2. >> now on booktv thomas stanton argues the difference between companies that successfully made it through the 2008 financial crisis and those that didn't was willingness of upper management to listen to feedback before making decisions. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon and welcome to the cato institute's. i'm the director of financial regulations, mark calabria and i am moderator of today's book form. when reading press coverage of a financial crisis one constantly comes across phrases like the banks did this for the banks did that. lost in these gener
to force the pentagon to end a ban on women serving in combat jobs. joining me is major mary jennings hagar,a pilot with the california air national guard one of the women in this lawsuit. m.j., welcome. glad to have you here. >> thank you so much, alex. thanks for having mere. >> i'm glad you're here. why do you want the combat ban for women lifted? >> well, really all we're talking about is lifting the policy. the combat exclusion policy does not reflect the reality of what's going on today. the combat exclusion policy does not keep women out of combat. that's a common misconception. women are in combat every day serving valiantly side by side with their brothers in arms. and the combat exclusion policy only accomplishes to tie the hands of the commanders in the field trying to make the decisions of whom to send on what missions. it increases discrimination and sews the seeds of doubt in the minds and women on the battle field on their abilities. it also hampers promotion and doesn't accomplish what you'd think is its primary goal of keeping women out of combat. >> i was reading your back
this is an offer they simply cannot refuse? that and the woman suing the pentagon so they can fight in combat. >>> we'll see you right here tomorrow at 8:00. thanks for getting up. a winter wonderland doesn't just happen. it takes some doing. some coordinating. and a trip to the one place with the new ideas that help us pull it all together. from the things that hang and shine...
on television five times when everyone in the white house, the pentagon knew that was just a bill of goods. >> gregg: i read that he said his moral fitness argument distilled down to its essence is this: she knew the video story line was questionable, and yet she was parroting these talking points. if you're a strong moral character, you say, wait a minute. i know there is something wrong with this. >> gregg, here is the issue: why wasn't hillary clinton out there? why weren't the few other people above susan rice there? was this kind of an opportunity for her to show her allegiance to the president so that when hillary left she could be secretary of state? by the way, she had access to all those presidential briefings. >> gregg: the classified information, she had access to? >> absolutely. she dug her heels in and said no, it's a spontaneous video. i want to know who told you that? not just who took out al-qaeda and terrorist that you knew about, but going back to mukasey, he says, wait a minute. she's saying and the president is saying she did an outstanding job at the u.n. really? do y
rights on the battlefield and four female filed a lawsuit, the pentagon says it cannot comment on the current case and while they say they're working on a solution, they claim it's a clear case of discrimination and is it? and a veteran of the marine corps, gunnery sergeant jessie james and since the ban was lifted on women in 1991, retired air force colonel, good to see you both. >> good morning. >> thanks for having me on. >> dave: this is a very interesting debate and why should women be excluded from combat. >> well, if women are already participating on the front line, that isn't the issue here and what i'm seeing in this lsuit is that women are insisting upon being in combat, infantry position and that's where i feel it's inappropriate because the requirements for them to get into the infantry are very, very extreme and men that do not pick that field to go into and are put in, based upon the requirements of joining the military. so if the women are getting into the field, all women must be capable of performing the function as the men are when they enlist into the milita
in the defense of the country out of the pentagon, and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, talk with senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act, and the future of the republican party. the president has written several books and reports, including his latest, "the debt bomb." live sunday at the 12:00 noon eastern. >> no, we hear from a syrian opposition spokesman about the latest developments in the ongoing syrian civil war. the spokesman urged the international community to intervene, and calls for u.s. leadership, rather than just humanitarian aid. from johns hopkins, this is an hour and a half. >> thank you. thank you for everyone. thank you for the john hopkins university for organizing this event. let me start by sharing with you a personal story that just happened today, which gives you just a sense of how our lives became tragic. today, one of my close friends, a well-known activist in my home town, has been killed by indiscriminate shelling in the city. daria is 7 kilometers south of damascus. and it has been days o
the money, but we could transfer responsibilities out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several books and reports. join our three-hour conversation with your calls, e-mails, tweets, and facebook comments for medical doctor, author, and senator tom coburn. >> he worked his way up, went to harvard law school, and at the urging of one of his brothers, emigrated out west to illinois. he arrived after about a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived on a steamboat in this muddy mining town, board himself in a log cabin, established a law practice, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer and then got involved politically, ran for congress, served for eight terms, and then defended abraham lincoln, obviously, from illinois, and then ulysses s. grant. as they were on the rise, washburne stated them is very close colleagues. after grant was elected presiden
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)